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Years in comics
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19th Century
1900s
1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904
1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909
1910s
1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914
1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919
1920s
1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924
1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929
1930s
1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934
1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939
1940s
1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944
1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949
1950s
1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954
1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959
1960s
1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964
1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969
1970s
1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974
1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979
1980s
1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984
1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989
1990s
1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994
1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999
2000s
2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004
2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009
2010s
2010 · 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014
2015 · 2016 · 2017 · 2018 · 2019

Notable events of 1982 in comics. See also List of years in comics.



Events and publications

Year overall

  • To stem the flow of creators defecting to companies such as First Comics, Pacific Comics, and Eclipse Comics, DC Comics begins offering royalties to artists and writers of regular newsstand comics that sell more than 100,000 copies;[1] Marvel soon follows suit with its creator-owned imprint Epic Comics. Launched by editor-in-chief Jim Shooter as a spin-off of the successful Epic Illustrated magazine, the Epic imprint allows creators to retain control and ownership of their properties. Co-edited by Al Milgrom and Archie Goodwin, the imprint also allows Marvel to publish a mature line of comics oriented toward an older audience. Epic titles are printed on higher quality paper than typical Marvel comics, and are only available via the direct market.[2]
  • After 41 years as a publisher, Harvey Comics ceases publishing.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

  • Norristown, Pennsylvania-based Comico Comics begins publishing with the release of the black-and-white anthology title Primer #1.
  • With issue #251, DC again revives Blackhawk volume 1, which ran from 1944 to 1968, and then from 1976 to 1977.
  • Josie and the Pussycats (1963 series) is cancelled by Archie Comics with issue #106.
  • Justice League of America #207 and All-Star Squadron #14 feature the beginning of the "Crisis on Earth-Prime" crossover between the two titles. The storyline continues into Justice League of America #208 and All-Star Squadron #15 in November and concludes in Justice League of America #209 in December.[9][10]
  • October 10 - Illustrator Ben Krefta is born

November

December

Exhibitions and shows

Conventions

Awards

Eagle Awards

Presented in 1983 for comics published in 1982:

First issues by title

DC Comics

Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew!

Release: March. Writer: Roy Thomas. Artists: Ross Andru, Scott Shaw, and Bob Smith

Daring New Adventures of Supergirl

Release: November. Writer: Paul Kupperberg. Artists: Carmine Infantino and Bob Oksner

The Fury of Firestorm

Release: June. Writer: Gerry Conway. Artists: Pat Broderick and Rodin Rodriguez.

Saga of the Swamp Thing

Release: May. Writer: Martin Pasko. Artist: Thomas Yeates.

Limited series

Atari Force: Promos distributed with Atari 2600 video games.

Writers: Gerry Conway and Roy Thomas. Artists: Ross Andru, Mike DeCarlo, and Dick Giordano

Camelot 3000

Release: December. Writer: Mike W. Barr. Artist: Brian Bolland

Marvel Comics

Dreadstar

Release: November by Epic Comics. Writer/Artist: Jim Starlin

G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero

Release: June. Writer: Larry Hama. Artists: Herb Trimpe and Bob McLeod

Marvel Fanfare

Release: March. Editor: Al Milgrom

Marvel Graphic Novel: "The Death of Captain Marvel"

Release: January. Writer/Artist: Jim Starlin.

The Mighty World of Marvel vol. 2

Release by Marvel UK: June. Editor: Dez Skinn.

Limited series

Hercules

Release: September. Writer/Artist: Bob Layton.

Marvel Super Hero Contest of Champions

Release: June. Writer: Mark Gruenwald. Artists John Romita, Jr. and Bob Layton.

Vision and the Scarlet Witch

Release: November. Writer: Bill Mantlo. Artists: Rick Leonardi, Ian Akin, and Brian Garvey.

Wolverine

Release: September. Writer: Chris Claremont. Artists: Frank Miller and Josef Rubinstein.

Pacific Comics

Alien Worlds

Release: December. Editor: Bruce Jones

Ms. Mystic

Release: October. Writer/Artist: Neal Adams

Starslayer: The Log of the Jolly Roger

Release: February. Writer/Artist: Mike Grell

Twisted Tales

Release: November. Editor: Bruce Jones

Other publishers

Destroyer Duck

Release: May by Eclipse Comics. Writer: Steve Gerber. Artist: Jack Kirby
Domino chance
Release: May by Chance Enterprises. Writer/Artist: Kevin Lenagh

Love and Rockets

Release: June by Fantagraphics. Writers/Artists: Los Bros Hernandez

Primer

Release: October by Comico Comics.

Vortex

Release: November by Vortex Comics. Editor: William P. Marks

Warrior

Release: March by Quality Communications. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Garry Leach and Alan Davis

Initial appearances by character name

DC Comics

Marvel Comics

Independent titles

References

  1. "Two Men and their Comic Books," in San Diego Reader, by Jay Allen Sanford, August 19, 2004. Accessed via Web (Archive.org) March 31, 2008.
  2. Shooter, Jim. "Bullpen Bulletins: The Truth About the Epic Comics Group!" Marvel comics cover-dated November 1982.
  3. Sanderson, Peter (September/October 1981). "Thomas/Colan Premiere Wonder Woman's New Look". Comics Feature (12/13): 23. "The hotly-debated new Wonder Woman uniform will be bestowed on the Amazon Princess in her first adventure written and drawn by her new creative team: Roy Thomas and Gene Colan...This story will appear as an insert in DC Comics Presents #41." 
  4. Riley, Shannon E. (May 2013). "A Matter of (Dr.) Fate Martin Pasko and Keith Giffen Discuss Their Magical Flash Backup Series". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (64): 64–68. 
  5. Manning, Matthew K.; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1980s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. Dorling Kindersley. p. 196. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9. "In a sixteen-page bonus preview insert in the middle of The New Teen Titans...was the debut story of Captain Carrot and his Amazing Zoo Crew." 
  6. Bolland, Brian; Pruett, Joe ed. (2006). The Art of Brian Bolland. Image Comics. p. 130. ISBN 1-58240-603-0. 
  7. Manning "1980s" in Dolan, p. 197: "[T]his issue...hid another dark secret: a sixteen-page preview comic featuring Marv Wolfman's newest team - Night Force. Chronicling the enterprise of the enigmatic Baron Winters and featuring the art of Gene Colan, Night Force spun out into an ongoing title of gothic mystery and horror the following month."
  8. Manning "1980s" in Dolan, p. 199: "The issue, written by longtime X-Men scribe Chris Claremont and drawn by Walter Simonson [was]...one of the most well-received crossovers of its time - or of any time for that matter - the team-up was a huge success."
  9. Manning "1980s" in Dolan, p. 198: "The Justice League of America teamed up with the Justice Society of America on a large-scale with 'Crisis on Earth-Prime', a five-part saga that crossed from the pages of Justice League of America into All-Star Squadron."
  10. Thomas, Roy (2000). "The Justice League-Justice Society Team-Ups". The All-Star Companion. TwoMorrows Publishing. pp. 191–192. ISBN 1-893905-05-5. 
  11. Higgins, Steve. "A+ Graphic Novels: Camelot 3000, GrayHaven Magazine (July 1, 2003).
  12. Kingman, Jim (May 2013). "The Ballad of Ollie and Dinah". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (64): 10–21. 
  13. Blau, Eleanor. "Weekender Guide," New York Times (26 Mar 1982), p. C.1.
  14. "Happenings: Other Events," New York Magazine (July 5–12, 1982), p. 134.
  15. wordsandpictures.org. "Bill Sienkiewicz-Awards, Exhibits". http://www.wordsandpictures.org/Elektra/elektra19.html. 
  16. Manning "1980s" in Dolan, p. 197: "The DCU's newest superhero team, the Global Guardians, was formed in this Superman tale by writer E. Nelson Bridwell and penciler Alex Saviuk."
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