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Gardner Fox

Real Name
Gardner Francis Cooper Fox
Pseudonyms
Gardner Fox; Gardner F. Fox; Jefferson Cooper; Bart Sommers; Paul Dean; Ray Gardner; Lynna Cooper; Rod Gray; Larry Dean; Robert Starr; Don, Ed, Warner and Michael Blake; Tex and Willis Blane; Ed Carlisle; Edgar Weston; Tex Slade; Eddie Duane


Job Titles

Gender

Date of Birth
May 20, 1911

Date of Death
December 24, 1986

Place of Birth
New York City, New York, United States of America

First publication

Unknown





Personal History

He was born in the borough of Brooklyn.


Professional History

Gardner Francis Cooper Fox (May 20, 1911 – December 24, 1986)[1] was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. Comic book historians estimate that he wrote over 4,000 comics stories.

Early life and career

For the complete article see Wikipedia. The original article was at Gardner Fox.
The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Hey Kids Comics Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

Books

Comics

Golden Age

Main article: Golden Age of Comic Books
For the complete article see Wikipedia. The original article was at Gardner Fox.
The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Hey Kids Comics Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.


Awards

Alley Award

Fox won two 1962 Alley Awards — for Best Script Writer and for Best Book-Length Story ("The Planet that Came to a Standstill" in Mystery in Space #75), with penciler Carmine Infantino — as well as a 1963 Alley, for Favorite Novel ("Crisis on Earths 1 and 2" in Justice League of America #21-22, with penciler Mike Sekowsky), and the 1965 Alley for Best Novel ("Solomon Grundy Goes on a Rampage" in Showcase #55) with penciler Murphy Anderson.

He was honored at the New York Comic Art Convention in 1971, and received an Inkpot Award at the San Diego ComiCon in 1978. In 1982, at Skycon II, he was awarded the "Jules Verne Award for Life-time achievement."

In 1998, he was posthumously awarded a Harvey Award and entered into the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame; a year later, he was inducted into the Eisner Award Hall of Fame.

In 2007, Fox was one of the year's two recipients of the Bill Finger Award for Excellence in Comic Book Writing, given under the auspices of Comic-Con International.[2]

Legacy

In 1967, Fox's literary agent, August Lenniger, suggested that Fox donate his notes, correspondence, and samples of his work to the University of Oregon as a tax write-off. Fox donated over fourteen boxes of comics, books, scripts, plot ideas, and fan letters dating back to the 1940s. Today, his records comprise the bulk of the university's Fox Collection.[3]

In 1968, Green Lantern debuted a character named after him, Guy Gardner.[4]

Gardner Fox died on December 24, 1986. He was survived by his wife Lynda, his son Jeffrey, his daughter Lynda, and four grandchildren.

In 2002, the Cartoon Network aired an episode of the animated TV series Justice League titled "Legends", an homage to Fox's Justice Society and his annual Silver Age Justice Society/Justice League crossovers. The episode was dedicated to Fox. Additionally, in the episode titled "Paradise Lost" A TV news reporter refers to Hurricane Gardner.

In the sixth episode of the second season of Young Justice, during a disaster which destroys part of the city, the Flash (Barry Allen) directs a woman to a homeless shelter that is located between streets named Gardner and Fox.

References

  1. "Newswatch: Flash Creator, Gardner Fox, Dead at 75". The Comics Journal (114): p. 28. February 1987. Archived from the original on January 9, 2012. http://www.tcj.com/archive-viewer-issue-114/?pid=10099. 
  2. "Evanier, Mark. "This Year's Bill Finger Award," News from Me, June 5, 2007". Newsfromme.com. http://www.newsfromme.com/archives/2007_06_05.html#013547. Retrieved 2011-03-21. 
  3. Gilbert, Michael. T. "The Fox and the Fans: Letters to Gardner F. Fox From Future Pros, 1959–1965." Alter Ego, vol. 2, no. 1 (Spring 1998), pp. p. 5-9.
  4. Green Lantern 59 (1968)

External links

Preceded by
None
Justice League writer
1960–1968
Succeeded by
Dennis O'Neil


Notes

  • No special notes.


Trivia

  • No trivia.



See Also


Work History


Official Website

  • None.


Links and References

  • None.
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