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Racism

Racism consists of several different and often related ideologies centered around the concept of race. Modern variants are often based in social perceptions of biological differences between peoples. These can take the form of social actions, practices or beliefs, or political systems that consider different races to be ranked as inherently superior or inferior to each other, based on presumed shared inheritable traits, abilities, or qualities. It may also hold that members of different races should be treated differently.[1][2][3]

Read more at Wikipedia...
This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Glossary:R.
The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Hey Kids Comics Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

  1. Racism Oxford Dictionaries
  2. "Racism" in R. Schaefer. 2008 Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity and Society. SAGE. p. 1113
  3. Newman, D. M. (2012). Sociology : exploring the architecture of everyday life (9th ed.). Los Angeles: SAGE. p. 405. ISBN 978-1-4129-8729-5. "racism: Belief that humans are subdivided into distinct groups that are different in their social behavior and innate capacities and that can be ranked as superior or inferior." 

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Radar Sense

An extrasensory means of perception by which the brain generates electromagnetic waves which travel outward, bounce off objects, and are again picked up by the brain, which thus determines what its surroundings are.

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Reality warper

Reality warping is the ability to alter reality, and is often regarded as the ultimate superpower among comic fans. Generally, it translates as the ability to reshape matter and energy, turn a person's thoughts or desires into reality, bend time and space just as the Phoenix Force does to travel across timelines, and bend, twist or possibly even rewrite the laws of physics. The Joker, wielding the power of Mr. Mxyzptlk as "Emperor Joker", was even able to rewrite logic itself, for example, making the whole world believe that 2 + 2 equals "fish".

Some of the most extreme reality warpers, like Mxyzptlk and James Jaspers, are not even limited by their own physical bodies and can alter their own stature and appearance at will to become whatever they want to be, no matter how bizarre it might be. This ability seems to go far beyond anything that "ordinary" shapeshifters like Mystique and Morph could even think of in their wildest imagination. Most reality warping individuals, at least in Marvel comics, tend to be mutants.

Marvel's Mutant Reality Warpers Some Marvel Mutants with potential for reality warping encountered in Marvel comics are, amongst others:


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Reboot

Reboot, means to discard all previous continuity in the series and start anew. Effectively, all previously-known history is declared by the writer to be null and void and the series starts over from the beginning.

This differs from a creator producing a separate interpretation of another creator's work; rather, the owner of the creation declares that the rebooted continuity is now the official version.

This term is often applied to comic books, where the prevailing continuity can be very important to the progress of future installments, acting (depending on circumstances and one's point of view) as a rich foundation from which to develop characters and storylines, or as a box limiting the story options available to tell and an irreconcilable mess of contradictory history. Such large continuities also become a barrier to introducing newcomers to the fandom, as the complex histories are difficult to learn, and make understanding the story very difficult; a reboot gives the chance for new fans to experience the story by reintroducing it in smaller and easier to understand installments.

Examples

  • In the mid-1990s, Marvel Comics turned several of their titles over to studios affiliated with Image Comics, and these titles (Fantastic Four, Captain America, The Avengers, and Iron Man — the Hulk would be included in this trend only as a character, but without his own title) were rebooted in their own separate universe, while the rest of Marvel's line maintained the original continuity in which the affected characters were presumed to have died in a cataclysmic battle. The rebooted titles lasted only a year, at which point the heroes involved returned to the original universe. See Heroes Reborn.
  • In addition, Marvel Comics also published Spider-Man: Chapter One by John Byrne, which was meant to be a complete reboot to the Spider-Man series and was treated as such until editorial changes caused the series to reboot itself, making all changes null and void.
  • In 2000, Marvel launched the Ultimate Marvel line of comic books that rebooted the Marvel Universe. The Ultimate series was intended to modernize the characters, to rewrite the individual characters into a more cohesive universe, and to make the series more appealing to non-Marvel fans; the huge back-story of the Marvel Universe, made it very difficult for newcomers to understand the characters and storylines. Unlike most reboots, however, the original Marvel Universe continued to publish as well. This makes the two lines appear to be parallel Universes rather than a true reboot.

(See Also: Canon, Retcon)
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Reincarnation

Reincarnation is the ability to return to life after having died. Often times, this means that the soul of an individual is reborn in a new body, but in some cases, Reincarnation serves as a form of resurrection, wherein the soul is given renewed life in the person's original body. Unlike Regeneration, Reincarnation does not enable one to regrow lost or damaged tissue.
(See Also: Characters with Reincarnation)
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Reflexes

The ability to react to danger with great speed or hightened abilities. For example the Taskmaster has Photographic Reflexes and can reproduce anything he sees to aid him.

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Repulsor

Anthony Stark (Earth-616) from Iron Man Vol 5 2 001

A repulsor is a form in which a high density muon beam[1] can be projected, as a powerful blast of concussive energy called repulsor blasts. Repulsor blasts may be directed by magnets and focused by electrostatic lenses, although they may also be self-focusing. One of the luminaries of repulsor design technology is Tony Stark, who has incorporated them into every iteration of his patented Iron Man armors since MK IV. Constructed using micro-circuitry, these repulsors are implemented into the palms of his battlesuit and are one of the armor's primary offensive tools.

The main usage of repulsors is for defense, as the blast in which they're emmited can even vaporize enemies. They can also be used to stabilize flight in the case of being used in Iron Man armors.

A repulsor generator is an electronic device which uses particle beam technology to project a repulsor blast. In numerous attacks perpetuated by Ezekiel Stane, all the repulsor generator units from Stark Industries, the only creator of this technology in the world, were destroyed. Luckly, Tony Stark had created a new miniaturized repulsor generator, called Repulsor Tech node, which he would later use to power himself, his armors and produce them in mass to finance his new creations for his new enterprise, Stark Resilient.

The latest model of Repulsor technology named is that of Mark IVa, featuring a different color for its beams, red.[2]

(See Also: Anthony Stark; Iron Man Armor)
  1. All-New Iron Manual #1
  2. Iron Man Vol 5 #2

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Retcon

A retcon (short for retroactive continuity) is, in a nutshell, a storyteller's tool that adds previously unknown material to an event in a previous story. As with any tool, the quality of the finished product depends on the user's skill and intent.

For a good example of bad retcons, see the Clone Saga.

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Robbery

Robbery is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force or threat of force or by putting the victim in fear. At common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear.[1] Precise definitions of the offence may vary between jurisdictions. Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two. Under English law, most forms of theft are triable either way, whereas robbery is triable only on indictment.

<center>Read more at Wikipedia...

This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Glossary:R.
The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Hey Kids Comics Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

  1. "Carter, Floyd J. vs U.S.". June 12, 2000. http://docket.medill.northwestern.edu/archives/000439.php. Retrieved 2008-05-04. 

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Robot

A robot is a mechanical or virtual artificial agent, usually an electro-mechanical machine that is guided by a computer program or electronic circuitry. Robots can be autonomous or semi-autonomous and range from humanoids, to industrial robots, collectively programmed swarm robots, and even microscopic nano robots. By mimicking a lifelike appearance or automating movements, a robot may convey a sense of intelligence or thought of its own.


This could include androids, synthezoids, artificial intelligences and golems.
(See Also: List of Robots)
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