FANDOM


Staff TemplateInformation-silk
John Ridgway

Real Name
John Ridgway
Gender

Date of Birth
May 4, 1940

Place of Birth
Great Britain

First publication

Unknown





Personal History

Personal History of John Ridgway is unknown.


Professional History

John Ridgway (born May 4, 1940[1]) is a British comic artist who began working in comics in 1973, drawing for DC Thomson's Commando title, and became a full-time professional comics artist in 1984. He has worked for numerous publishers including DC and 2000AD, with the majority of his work for Marvel being on Marvel UK's Doctor Who Magazine.

Career

Ridgway began his career initially as a hobby, drawing D.C.Thompson's Commando War Stories alongside professional work as a design engineer. In 1984 Ridgway became a full-time professional, broadening his employment to include 2000 AD, Guttenberghus, Marvel Comics and DC Comics.

Ridgway's full-colour work is immediately distinctive for its unusual realism coupled with a delicate, sketchy pencil line, the two combining to give a slightly old-fashioned look influenced strongly by classic British artist Frank Hampson. This has made him ideal for illustrating strips such as the 1960s set Summer Magic and Enid Blyton's The Famous Five, but it is also a look that lends itself well to large-scale science fiction such as Babylon 5. His portfolio is unusually wide, incorporating Doctor Who, Zoids, the Incredible Hulk and My Name is Chaos.

Ridgway has been responsible for creating the look for a number of series, including Hellblazer,[2] Luke Kirby and Junker, a sign of the high regard in which he is held by many editors. He was also the artist chosen to depict Judge Dredd without his helmet for the first and only time in the character's 28-year history, in the saga The Dead Man.

He has recently begun experimenting with incorporating computer graphics into his work.

Bibliography

Comics work includes:

  • Commando:
    • "Weekend Warriors" (in #748, 1973)
    • "Counter Spy" (in #864, 1974)
    • "No-Man's Land" (in #896, 1974)
    • "Advance!" (in #1490, 1981)
    • "The Line-Shooter" (in #1565, 1981)
    • "Depth-Charges Away!" (in #1654, 1982)
    • "Night of Reckoning" (in #3009, 1996)
    • "Honour!" (in #3362, 2000)
    • "Viking Slave" (in #3471, 2001), continues in;
    • "Free to Fight" (in #3482, 2001)
    • "Mountain Warfare" (in #3530, 2002)
    • "Unexploded Bomb!" (in #3546, 2002)
    • "H-Boat Hunt" (in #3830, 2005)
    • "The Final Flight" (in #3903, 2006)
    • "H-Boat Havoc" (in #3986, 2007)
    • "H-Boat Feud" (in #4035, 2007)
    • "The Axeman" (in #4060, 2007)
    • "H-Boat Hi-Jack" (with Alan Hebden, in #4098, 2008)
    • "The Fighting Fisherman" (with Bill Styles, in #4113, 2008)
    • "Commando versus Kommando" (with Alan Hebden, in #4121, 2008)
    • "The Lost Tanks" (with Alan Hebden, in #4140, 2008)
    • "The Fighting Brothers" (with Mike Knowles, in #4146, 2008)


  • Transformers: "Man of Iron" pt 1–2 (in Transformers #9–10, 1985, #33 [US] 1987)
  • One-Off: "Candy and the Catchman" (with Grant Morrison, in 2000 AD #491, 1986)
  • Judge Dredd:
    • "The Raggedy Man" (with John Wagner and Alan Grant, in 2000 AD #525-26, 1987)
    • "Twister" (with John Wagner, in 2000 AD #588-591, 1988)
    • "A Night at the Opera" (with John Wagner, in 2000 AD #597, 1988)
    • "Alzhiemer's Block" (with John Wagner, in 2000 AD #605-606, 1988)
    • "Radlander" (with John Wagner, in Judge Dredd Megazine #4.16-4.18, 2002)
    • "Damned Ranger" (with John Wagner, in Judge Dredd Megazine #218-220, 2004)
    • "Cursed Earth Rules" (with Simon Spurrier, in Judge Dredd Megazine #236, 2005)
  • The Journal of Luke Kirby (with Alan McKenzie): [1]
    • "Summer Magic" (in 2000 AD #571-577, 1988)
    • "The Dark Path" (in 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special 1990)
    • "The Night Walker" (in 2000 AD #800-812, 1992)
    • "Sympathy for the Devil Prologue" (in 2000 AD #850-851, 1993)
    • "Trick or Treat" (in 2000 AD 1994 Yearbook, 1993)
    • "The Price" (in 2000 AD #972, 1995)
  • Junker (with Michael Fleisher)
    • "Junker Part 1" (in 2000 AD #708-716, 1990–1991)
    • "Junker Part 2" (in 2000 AD #724-730, 1991)
  • Calhab Justice (with Jim Alexander):[3]
    • "Calhab Justice" (in Judge Dredd Megazine #2.10-2.13, 1992)
    • "Hogmanay" (in Judge Dredd Megazine #2.18, 1992)
    • "Family Snapshot" (in Judge Dredd Megazine #2.64-2.66, 1994)
  • Vector 13:
    • "Case One: Who Was the Mothman?" (with Shaky Kane, in 2000 AD #951, 1995)
    • "Case Seven: Are They Cats?" (with Peter Hogan, in 2000 AD #957, 1995)
    • "Case One: Berserkers" (with Brian Williamson, in 2000 AD #965, 1995)
    • "Case Six: A Salver in the Heavens" (with Dan Abnett, in 2000 AD #970, 1995)
    • "Case Eight: Worlds at War" (with Dan Abnett, in 2000 AD #995, 1996)
    • "Case Ten: Video Nasty" (with Pat Mills, in 2000 AD #997, 1996)
  • Middenface McNulty (with Alan Grant):
    • "Mutopia" (in Judge Dredd Megazine #205-207, 2003)
    • "Killoden" (in Judge Dredd Megazine #224-229, 2004–2005)

Notes

References

</dl>


Notes

  • No special notes.


Trivia

  • No trivia.



See Also


Work History


Official Website

  • None.


Links and References

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.