m (→‎Volume 1 (1959–1985): clean up, replaced: metafiction → Metafiction)
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Infantino's last issue was #174 (November 1967) and the next issue saw [[Ross Andru]] become the new artist of the series as well as featuring the second race between the Flash and [[Superman]], two characters known for their super-speed powers.<ref>{{cite comic| writer= [[E. Nelson Bridwell|Bridwell, E. Nelson]]| penciller= [[Ross Andru|Andru, Ross]]| inker= [[Mike Esposito|Esposito, Mike]]| story= The Race to the End of the Universe| title= The Flash | issue= 175| date= December 1967}}</ref>
 
Infantino's last issue was #174 (November 1967) and the next issue saw [[Ross Andru]] become the new artist of the series as well as featuring the second race between the Flash and [[Superman]], two characters known for their super-speed powers.<ref>{{cite comic| writer= [[E. Nelson Bridwell|Bridwell, E. Nelson]]| penciller= [[Ross Andru|Andru, Ross]]| inker= [[Mike Esposito|Esposito, Mike]]| story= The Race to the End of the Universe| title= The Flash | issue= 175| date= December 1967}}</ref>
   
The series presented [[metafiction]]al stories featuring [[List of comics creators appearing in comics|comics creators appearing within the Flash's adventures]] such as the "Flash &mdash; Fact Or Fiction" in issue #179 in which the Flash finds himself on "[[Earth Prime]]". He contacts the "one man on Earth who might believe his fantastic story and give him the money he needs. The editor of that ''Flash'' comic mag !" Julius Schwartz helps the Flash build a [[cosmic treadmill]] so that he can return home.<ref>McAvennie "1960s" in Dolan, p. 130: "Trapped on 'Earth-Prime', the Flash knew only one man could possibly help him: DC Comics editor Julius Schwartz."</ref> Several years later, the series' longtime writer [[Cary Bates]] wrote himself into the story in issue #228.<ref>{{cite comic| writer= [[Cary Bates|Bates, Cary]]| penciller= [[Irv Novick|Novick, Irv]]| inker= [[Tex Blaisdell|Blaisdell, Tex]]| story= The Day I Saved the Life of the Flash| title= The Flash| issue= 228| date= July–August 1974}}</ref> Four months after the cancellation of his own title, [[Hal Jordan|Green Lantern]] began a backup feature in ''The Flash'' #217 (Aug.-Sept. 1972) and appeared in most issues through ''The Flash'' #246 (Jan. 1977) until his [[Green Lantern (comic book)|own solo series]] was revived.<ref>{{cite magazine|last = Greenberger|first = Robert|authorlink = Robert Greenberger|title = Green Lantern The Emerald Backups|magazine = [[Back Issue (magazine)|Back Issue]]|issue = 64|pages = 3-9|publisher = [[TwoMorrows Publishing]]|date = May 2013}}</ref> Schwartz, who had edited the title since 1959, left the series as of issue #269 (January 1979).<ref name="GCD-Schwartz">[http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?ind_pub_notes=&reprint_notes=&letters=&series=Flash&series_notes=&issue_notes=&synopsis=&colors=&keywords=&isbn=&tracking_notes=&job_number=&issues=&issue_date=&issue_reprinted=None&title=&variant_name=&brand=&feature=&indicia_publisher=&pub_name=DC&is_indexed=None&start_date=1958&pub_notes=&inks=&issue_title=&end_date=1980&format=&brand_notes=&price=&barcode=&volume=&pages=&characters=&genre=&issue_pages=&order2=date&order3=&order1=series&pencils=&target=issue&story_editing=Julius+Schwartz&notes=&is_surrogate=None&issue_count=&issue_editing=Julius+Schwartz&method=icontains&script=&logic=True&indicia_frequency=&story_reprinted=None&page=1 Julius Schwartz' run on ''The Flash''] at the [[Grand Comics Database]]</ref>
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The series presented Metafictional stories featuring [[List of comics creators appearing in comics|comics creators appearing within the Flash's adventures]] such as the "Flash &mdash; Fact Or Fiction" in issue #179 in which the Flash finds himself on "[[Earth Prime]]". He contacts the "one man on Earth who might believe his fantastic story and give him the money he needs. The editor of that ''Flash'' comic mag !" Julius Schwartz helps the Flash build a [[cosmic treadmill]] so that he can return home.<ref>McAvennie "1960s" in Dolan, p. 130: "Trapped on 'Earth-Prime', the Flash knew only one man could possibly help him: DC Comics editor Julius Schwartz."</ref> Several years later, the series' longtime writer [[Cary Bates]] wrote himself into the story in issue #228.<ref>{{cite comic| writer= [[Cary Bates|Bates, Cary]]| penciller= [[Irv Novick|Novick, Irv]]| inker= [[Tex Blaisdell|Blaisdell, Tex]]| story= The Day I Saved the Life of the Flash| title= The Flash| issue= 228| date= July–August 1974}}</ref> Four months after the cancellation of his own title, [[Hal Jordan|Green Lantern]] began a backup feature in ''The Flash'' #217 (Aug.-Sept. 1972) and appeared in most issues through ''The Flash'' #246 (Jan. 1977) until his [[Green Lantern (comic book)|own solo series]] was revived.<ref>{{cite magazine|last = Greenberger|first = Robert|authorlink = Robert Greenberger|title = Green Lantern The Emerald Backups|magazine = [[Back Issue (magazine)|Back Issue]]|issue = 64|pages = 3-9|publisher = [[TwoMorrows Publishing]]|date = May 2013}}</ref> Schwartz, who had edited the title since 1959, left the series as of issue #269 (January 1979).<ref name="GCD-Schwartz">[http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?ind_pub_notes=&reprint_notes=&letters=&series=Flash&series_notes=&issue_notes=&synopsis=&colors=&keywords=&isbn=&tracking_notes=&job_number=&issues=&issue_date=&issue_reprinted=None&title=&variant_name=&brand=&feature=&indicia_publisher=&pub_name=DC&is_indexed=None&start_date=1958&pub_notes=&inks=&issue_title=&end_date=1980&format=&brand_notes=&price=&barcode=&volume=&pages=&characters=&genre=&issue_pages=&order2=date&order3=&order1=series&pencils=&target=issue&story_editing=Julius+Schwartz&notes=&is_surrogate=None&issue_count=&issue_editing=Julius+Schwartz&method=icontains&script=&logic=True&indicia_frequency=&story_reprinted=None&page=1 Julius Schwartz' run on ''The Flash''] at the [[Grand Comics Database]]</ref>
 
 
 
Bates wrote ''The Flash'' #275 (July 1979) wherein the title character's wife, [[Iris West Allen]] was killed.<ref>McAvennie "1970s" in Dolan, p. 182: "Life for the Fastest Man Alive screeched to a halt after writer Cary Bates and artist Alex Saviuk played 'The Last Dance' for the Flash's wife, Iris West Allen."</ref> [[Doctor Fate]] was featured in a series of back-up stories in ''The Flash'' from #306 (Feb. 1982) to #313 (Sept. 1982) written by [[Martin Pasko]] and drawn by [[Keith Giffen]].<ref>{{cite magazine|last = Riley|first = Shannon E.|title = A Matter of (Dr.) Fate Martin Pasko and Keith Giffen Discuss Their Magical ''Flash'' Backup Series|magazine = Back Issue|issue = 64|pages = 64-68|publisher = TwoMorrows Publishing|date = May 2013}}</ref> A major shakeup occurred in the title in the mid-1980s. The Flash inadvertently kills his wife's murderer, the [[Professor Zoom|Reverse-Flash]], in ''The Flash'' #324 (Aug. 1983).<ref>Manning, Matthew K. "1980s" in Dolan, p. 203: "Written by Cary Bates, with art by Flash legend Carmine Infantino, the story saw...[the Flash] accidentally break the Reverse-Flash's neck."</ref> This led to an extended storyline titled "The Trial of the Flash" in which the hero must face the repercussions of his actions. Bates became the editor as well as the writer of ''The Flash'' title during this time and oversaw it until its cancellation in 1985.<ref>